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25 Spring Backpacking Trips in British Columbia

25 Spring Backpacking Trips in British Columbia

After a long winter, I’m usually in a rush for summer to start so I can go backpacking. But it can be frustrating since most trails are snow-covered well into June and July. However, if you know where to look, there are lots of places to go on spring backpacking trips in British Columbia.

In BC, most mountain trails are snow-covered between late October and mid-June. However, there are lots of lower elevation trails that are snow-free between March and November. There are even a few on this list that you can backpack year-round.

While this post is aimed at locations where you can go on an overnight hiking trip in spring, most of these trips make great fall backpacking trips in British Columbia too.

This list of 25 spring backpacking trips in British Columbia includes:

  • Destinations near Vancouver, on Vancouver Island, and in BC’s interior
  • Trips ranging in difficulty from beginner to expert
  • Hikes between 2 and 8 days long
  • Trails that are usually snow-free by March, April, or May and stay snow-free until October or November
  • Tips for spring backpacking trips in British Columbia
  • Bonus: Spring backpacking suggestions for Washington State

This is a sensitive wilderness area. Learn how to Leave No Trace to keep the wilderness wild. Make sure you are prepared by bringing the 10 Essentials. Get ready for adventure with this checklist of things to do before every hike.

Hey there: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission at no cost to you. Thanks for your support. -Taryn

Map of Spring Backpacking Trips in British Columbia

Spring Backpacking Trips in British Columbia Google Map
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Tips for Spring Backpacking in British Columbia

Backpacking in the spring has its own challenges. Here are a few things to watch out for:

Weather: In spring, the weather is colder and wetter than in summer. It’s also less predictable. Pack accordingly and be prepared to cancel your trip or switch to a different destination if the forecast looks bad.

Trail Conditions: Many trails suffer blow-downs, wash-outs, and flooding over the winter. Often, parks staff and volunteers do trail maintenance in late May or June, which means trails can be in rough shape before then.

Mud: Wet and muddy trails are inevitable in spring. Come prepared with waterproof hiking boots and gaiters.

Creek crossings: Streams run high in the spring with a combo of snow-melt and rain. Bridges may be washed out and fords may be dangerous. Be prepared to turn back.

Bears: As they wake up from hibernation and tend to new cubs, bears are more active in spring, especially in valley-bottom and coastal locations where there are lots of things for them to eat at this time of year. Read more about bear safety for backpackers.

Seasonal closures: Some parks and trails are closed in the off-season, or may have temporary closures to due damaged infrastructure. Check park and trail websites before you go.

Trailhead access issues: In spring, logging roads that access trailheads may be muddy or washed out. If you’re heading to a trail that requires a water taxi or floatplane, fog and rough weather may delay or cancel your trip. Shuttle services between trailheads may not start operating until May.

Spring Backpacking Trips in Southwestern British Columbia

Viewpoint Beach and Halfmoon Beach, Golden Ears Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 9.6 to 19.4 km round trip

Best Months: April to November

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 170 to 275 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping fees are $5/person/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

This easy hike in Golden Ears Provincial Park follows the banks of Gold Creek. There are trails on both the west and east sides of the creek, connected by a bridge, so loop trips are possible. You can camp at Viewpoint Beach or venture further upstream to Halfmoon Beach. This is the closest place to Vancouver that you can take a spring backpacking trip in British Columbia.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia. For info on camping fees, see Golden Ears Provincial Park.

Lindeman and Greendrop Lakes, Chilliwack Lake Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 3.4 to 11 km round trip

Best Months: April to early November

Difficulty: Easy/moderate

Elevation Gain: 200 to 350 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping fees are $5/person/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

It’s a short hike to picturesque Lindeman Lake where you can camp next to the tranquil turquoise waters. If you have more energy, carry on along the rougher to Greendrop Lake. Lindeman Lake is often snow-free in April, but Greendrop Lake holds snow into May.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia, and the Chilliwack East Recreational Map from Trail Ventures BC. For info on camping fees, see S⨱ótsaqel / Chilliwack Lake Provincial Park.

Book cover for Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

Get My Book…

Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

A one-stop resource for backpackers in beautiful British Columbia.

  • 40 backpacking trips within a few hours of Vancouver
  • Info about permits, reservations, and campsite facilities
  • Detailed maps and photos
  • Advice for extending your trip
  • Points of cultural and natural history

Skagit River Trail, Skagit Valley Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 8 km round trip or 14 km traverse

Best Months: April to November

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 75 m

Fees and Reservations: None.

Note: Access to this trail was disrupted by the November 2021 storms. The river has changed course at the Sumallo Grove trailhead and the bridge is not accessible. The Silver-Skagit Road in Skagit Valley Provincial Park also suffered extensive damage and is not driveable to the trailhead. Hopefully access will be restored soon.

This laid-back hike follows a historic fur-trade route along the banks of the Skagit River as it flows downstream. You can do an 8 km round trip hike from the Sumallo Grove Trailhead in Manning Provincial Park, camping at Delacy Camp. If you have two cars, make a 14 km traverse from Sumallo Grove to Silver-Skagit Road.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia and the E.C. Manning & Skagit Valley Provincial Parks map from Clark Geomatics.

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

Tikwalus Heritage Trail, Fraser Canyon

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 13 km round trip

Best Months: May to October

Difficulty: Challenging

Elevation Gain: 790 m

Fees and Reservations: None

This historical Indigenous and fur trade route leads steeply up from Highway 1 in the Fraser Canyon to several spectacular lookouts. Camp high on a bluff near several small lakes. The trail takes its name from a former Nlaka’pamux village near the trailhead.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia.

Lower Stein Valley, Stein Valley Nlaka’pamux Heritage Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 4 to 26 km round trip

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 30 to 350 m

Fees and Reservations: None.

The warm, dry climate in Lytton makes the Lower Stein Valley my favourite choice for spring backpacking trips in British Columbia – Over the years, I’ve been there six times in March, April, and May. The valley is a spiritual place for the local Nlaka’pamux First Nation. The trail travels next to the Stein River passing Indigenous pictographs and culturally modified trees. Choose from five different campgrounds spaced out along the lower section of the trail.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia and the Stein to Joffre Trail Map by Trail Ventures BC.

Cheakamus Lake, Garibaldi Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 7 to 14 km round trip

Best months: May to early November

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 50 m

Fees and Reservations: Reservations are required and cost $6/night/tent pad. Camping fees are $10/person/night.

As the lowest elevation trail in Garibaldi Provincial Park, Cheakamus Lake is a good spring backpacking destination. The flat and easy trail leads through old-growth forest to the beautiful glacially-fed lake. Camp at the lake outlet or follow the trail along the shoreline to camp at Singing Creek.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia and the Garibaldi Provincial Park Map by Clark Geomatics. For info on camping fees and reservations, see Garibaldi Provincial Park.

Book cover for Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

Get My Book…

Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

A one-stop resource for backpackers in beautiful British Columbia.

  • 40 backpacking trips within a few hours of Vancouver
  • Info about permits, reservations, and campsite facilities
  • Detailed maps and photos
  • Advice for extending your trip
  • Points of cultural and natural history

Fairview Bay/Saltery Bay Loop, Sunshine Coast Trail

Duration: 2 to 3 days

Distance: 12 km round trip or 18 km loop

Best Months: April to November

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 150 to 570 m

Fees and Reservations: None

Portions of the Sunshine Coast Trail are snow-covered most of the year, but you can tackle this low elevation section starting at the southern terminus in Saltery Bay. Hike along the coast to Fairview Bay hut as an out-and-back trip, or take on the full loop, camping at either Fairview Bay Hut or Rainy Day Lake Hut.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia.

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

Confederation Lake and Fiddlehead Landing, Sunshine Coast Trail

Duration: 2 to 3 days

Distance: 15 to 30 km round trip

Best Months: April to November

Difficulty: Moderate/Challenging

Elevation Gain: 650 m

Fees and Reservations: None

Here’s another low elevation section of the Sunshine Coast Trail (SCT) that is perfect for a spring backpacking trip. The trail starts at Inland Lake, then climbs steeply through thick old-growth forest to a hut on the shores of Confederation Lake. Follow the SCT downhill to Fiddlehead Landing on the shores of Powell Lake and another hut.

More Info: Find details on this hike in my book, Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia.

Sarah Point to Powell River, Sunshine Coast Trail

Duration: 3-4 Days

Distance: 50 km traverse

Best Months: March to November

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 375 m

Fees and Reservations: None

This northern section of the Sunshine Coast Trail is an ideal spring backpacking destination. Arrange a water taxi or 4WD shuttle to the trailhead at Sarah Point or skip the first few kilometres by taking the shortcut trail to Wednesday Lake from Sarah Point Road. Finish your trip at the Shinglemill Pub in Powell River. Along the way, walk along bluffs speckled with arbutus trees, through old-growth forest, and past small lakes.

More Info: Read my trip report from my March backpacking trip on the northern section of the Sunshine Coast Trail. Part of this section is also featured in my book Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia.

Spring Backpacking Trips on Vancouver Island

Narvaez Bay, Saturna Island

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 3.5 km round trip

Best Months: Year-round

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 80 m

Fees and Reservations: Reservations are required and cost $11.50/night/tent pad. Camping fees are $10.50/person/night.

Note: Narvaez Bay was damaged in the November 2021 storms. The area is closed for repairs until July 1, 2022.

This oceanfront campground is located on the southeastern side of Saturna Island in Gulf Islands National Park Reserve. It’s an easy hike in from the trailhead and the trail is also open to bikes. FYI: There is no potable water here so you’ll have to pack in your own.

More Info: See Gulf Islands National Park Reserve for camping reservations.

Juan de Fuca Trail, Juan de Fuca Provincial Park

Duration: 3 to 5 days

Distance: 47 km traverse

Best Months: Year-round

Difficulty: Challenging

Elevation Gain: 190 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $10/person/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

Note: As of May 19, 2022, the Juan de Fuca Trail is fully open. Some sections were previously closed for repairs.

This rugged trail runs along the coast from near Jordan River to Port Renfrew. It’s a little shorter than the West Coast Trail, its famous neighbour to the north, but it’s just as rugged and has more hills. This trail crosses lots of steep gullies, so it is prone to washouts in the spring, fall, and winter months.

More Info: Read my Juan de Fuca Trail guide for full details. For info on camping fees, see Juan de Fuca Provincial Park.

READ NEXT: Juan De Fuca Trail Guide: Backpacking on Vancouver Island

West Coast Trail, Pacific Rim National Park

Duration: 5-8 days

Distance: 75 km traverse

Best Months: May to September

Difficulty: Challenging

Elevation Gain: 225 m

Fees and Reservations: Reservations are required and cost $25.75. Trail fees are $180. You will also need to pay National Park entry fees of $10/person/day.

Note: The West Coast Trail is open from May 1 to September 30 each year. The National Park officially closes the trail from October to the end of April.

The West Coast Trail is Canada’s most famous multi-day hike. Since it opens in May, it also makes a great spring backpacking trip. The 75-kilometre-long trail follows the wild shoreline with the help of bridges, ladders, and cable cars. Each night you will camp on a wilderness beach.

More Info: Get details on this hike in my West Coast Trail guide. For info on reservations, trail fees, and National Park fees, see Pacific Rim National Park.

READ NEXT: Your Guide to the West Coast Trail in British Columbia

Keeha Beach, Pacific Rim National Park

A hiker walks on Keeha Beach near Bamfield, BC in Pacific Rim National Park
Keeha Beach

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 7 km round trip

Best Months: May to early October

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 45 m

Fees and Reservations: Reservations and camping fees are required, but 2022 fees are TBA. You will also need to pay National Park entry fees of $10/person/day.

Note: Keeha Beach is open from May 1 to early October each year. The National Park officially closes the trail from early October to the end of April.

This sandy beach is located just north of the West Coast Trail. It’s a short hike to get there, but allow plenty of time as the trail is very rough with lots of slippery roots and tons of mud. (The mud is pretty epic – comparable to the North Coast Trail.) You can also day hike to the nearby Cape Beale Lighthouse.

More Info: For trail info, fees, and reservations, see Pacific Rim National Park.

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

Wild Side Trail, Flores Island

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 22 km round trip

Best Months: May to October

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 30 m

Fees and Reservations: Trail fees are $15/person. Camping fees are $10/person/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

Note: The Wild Side Trail is open from May to October each year. The Ahousaht Nation officially closes the trail from November to April.

The Wild Side Trail has one of the best effort to reward ratios of any of Vancouver Island’s coastal trails. It’s one of my favourite spring backpacking trips in British Columbia – I’ve done it twice in May! It’s an easy walk along beaches and through the forest to a gorgeous campsite at Cow Bay. There are also two other campsites along the way. The hike is located in Ahousaht First Nation territory on Flores Island near Tofino, so you’ll need to arrange a water taxi.

More Info: Get details on this hike in my Wild Side Trail guide. For info on trail fees and camping fees, see the Wild Side Trail website.

READ NEXT: Wild Side Trail: Hiking and Camping Guide

Hesquiat Peninsula Trail, West Coast Vancouver Island

Duration: 4 to 5 days

Distance: 50 km traverse

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Very Challenging

Elevation Gain: 50 m

Fees and Reservations: None

Note: The Hesquiat Peninsula Trail is currently closed due to the pandemic. Please respect this closure as it was requested by the local Indigenous community.

If you’re looking for an off-the-beaten-path adventure, take a water taxi or floatplane to the remote Hesquiat Peninsula on the west coast of Vancouver Island. This informal trail follows the rugged coastline as it bucks and dips across rocky headlands, through surge channels, and along beaches. There are no facilities or formal campsites.

More info: See Hiking the West Coast of Vancouver Island by Tim Leadem, Hesquiat Peninsula Provincial Park, and the Hesquiat Peninsula Map by John Baldwin.

Nootka Trail, West Coast Vancouver Island

Duration: 3 to 5 days

Distance: 36 km traverse

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 50 m

Fees and Reservations: Trail fees are $50/person. As well, each group must pay a $20 landing fee. All camping is first-come, first-served.

The Nootka Trail is my favourite coastal hike in BC. It’s located on Nootka Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island, so you need to take a water taxi or floatplane to get there. What makes this trail special is that it is almost entirely on the beach. There are no formal facilities or campsites.

More info: See my Nootka Trail trip report, the Nootka Trail Topographic Trail Map by Wild Coast Publishing, and the Nootka Island Map by John Baldwin. For info on fees, see Yuqot.ca, the Mowachaht-Muchalaht First Nation website.

READ NEXT: Sunshine on the Edge of the World: Nootka Trail Trip Report

Tatchu Peninsula Trail, West Coast Vancouver Island

Duration: 3 to 4 days

Distance: 35 km traverse

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Challenging

Elevation Gain: 30 m

Fees and Reservations: None.

The Tatchu Peninsula is a wilderness hike on the west coast of Vancouver Island near the logging camp of Port Eliza. Get there by floatplane or water taxi. The hike traces a route down the west side of the peninsula, linking numerous beaches with short overland trails. There are no formal facilities or campsites.

More info: See Hiking the West Coast of Vancouver Island by Tim Leadem, Rugged Point Provincial Park, and the Tatchu Peninsula Map by John Baldwin.

Raft Cove, Raft Cove Provincial Park

Logs on the beach at Raft Cove Provincial Park on Northern Vancouver Island
Raft Cove

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 4 km round trip

Best Months: Year-round

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 70 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $5/person/night between May and September. (Otherwise, it is free.) All campsites are first-come, first-served.

Raft Cove is a remote beach on the north end of Vancouver Island, reached by a maze of logging roads from the tiny town of Holberg. It’s a short walk into the beach, but the rough and muddy trail makes it seem longer. Camp on the sandy beach and watch surfers work the waves just offshore.

You can also canoe in to the campsite on the Macjack River – the put-in location is a rough drive on logging roads from Winter Harbour.

More info: See Raft Cove Provincial Park for info and camping fees.

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

San Josef Bay, Cape Scott Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 5 km return

Best Months: Year-round

Difficulty: Easy

Elevation Gain: 45 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $10/person/night between May and September. (Otherwise, it is free.) All campsites are first-come, first-served.

This is the easiest trail in Cape Scott Provincial Park, but it still has spectacular scenery. The flat trail winds through the coastal forest and ends at a beautiful beach. At low tide, you can explore incredible sea stacks. There are two beaches to camp on separated by a headland that is impassable at high tide.

More info: For more info, see my Cape Scott guide, the North Coast Trail Map by John Baldwin, and the North Coast Trail Waterproof Map by Wild Coast. For camping fees, see Cape Scott Provincial Park.

READ NEXT: Cape Scott Trail Guide: Hiking and Camping on Northern Vancouver Island

Cape Scott Trail, Cape Scott Provincial Park

Duration: 2 to 3 days

Distance: 41.5 km round trip

Best Months: Year-round

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 100 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $10/person/night between May and September. (Otherwise, it is free.) All campsites are first-come, first-served.

While the north end of Vancouver Island gets a lot of rain, the Cape Scott Trail can be a great spring backpacking destination if you get a window of good weather. It’s a long hike through bog and coastal forest on old settler trails to the campsite at Nel’s Bight. From there, you can day hike to Cape Scott, the northernmost point on Vancouver Island.

More Info: Get details on this hike in my Cape Scott Trail guide, the North Coast Trail Map by John Baldwin, and the North Coast Trail Waterproof Map by Wild Coast. For camping fees, see Cape Scott Provincial Park.

READ NEXT: Cape Scott Trail Guide: Hiking and Camping on Northern Vancouver Island

North Coast Trail, Cape Scott Provincial Park

Duration: 5 to 6 days

Distance: 43 km traverse

Best Months: Mid-April to early October

Difficulty: Very Challenging

Elevation Gain: 245 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $10/person/night between May and September. (Otherwise, it is free.) All campsites are first-come, first-served.

This tough trail traverses the northern end of Vancouver Island. It starts with a water taxi drop-off in Shushartie Bay and ends when it intersects the Cape Scott Trail at Nissen Bight. In between, there is lots of muddy and rough trail through coastal bog and old-growth forest, and a few gorgeous beaches.

More Info: Get details on this hike in my North Coast Trail guide, the North Coast Trail Map by John Baldwin, and the North Coast Trail Waterproof Map by Wild Coast. For camping fees, see Cape Scott Provincial Park.

READ NEXT: North Coast Trail Guide: Backpacking on Vancouver Island

Spring Backpacking Trips in British Columbia’s Interior

Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park

Duration: 2 to 3 days

Distance: 22 to 40 km

Best Months: Mid-March to October

Difficulty: Moderate/Challenging

Elevation Gain: 200 to 1100 m

Fees and Reservations: None.

This large park between Kelowna and Naramata has several different spring backpacking options. You can hike to Divide Lake and Baker Lake near the summit of Okanagan Mountain. You can also follow the Wild Horse Canyon Trail to campsites on the shores of Okanagan Lake. A connecter trail links the two, so you can make a big loop. Spring and fall are the best time to visit this park, as it is too hot in the summer.

More info: See Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park.

Okanagan High Rim Trail

Duration: 3 to 4 days

Distance: 58 km traverse

Best Months: May to October

Difficulty: Moderate/Challenging

Elevation Gain: 800 m

Fees and Reservations: None.

This trail follows an elevated route above the Okanagan Valley between Vernon and Kelowna. In most years, it is snow-free by early to mid May. This trail is only a few years old and crisscrosses lots of forestry roads in between great viewpoints and small lakes.

More Info: Get the details from the Okanagan High Rim Trail Association.

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

Deer Point Trail, Gladstone Provincial Park

Duration: 2 days

Distance: 12 to 22 km round trip

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 150 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $13/group/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

The low elevation Deer Point Trail along Christina Lake in Gladstone Provincial Park near Grand Forks make a good spring backpacking destination. You can camp at Trapper Creek partway along the trail or at Troy Creek at the north end of the lake. Both campsites are open to boaters as well.

More Info: Get info on the trail and camping fees from Gladstone Provincial Park.

Flatiron Trails, Wells Gray Provincial Park

Duration: 2 to 3 days

Distance: 10 to 46 km round trip or 25 km traverse

Best Months: April to October

Difficulty: Moderate

Elevation Gain: 250 to 500 m

Fees and Reservations: Camping costs $5/person/night. All campsites are first-come, first-served.

Note: A few key bridges washed out in 2021 and with high water, it is currently not possible to cross the creeks and reach any of the campsites.

Even though it is near the entrance to the park, Flatiron area of Wells Gray Provincial Park is a bit under-the-radar. A network of trails follows creeks to the banks of the Clearwater River and there are three backcountry campgrounds. You can access the area from three different trailheads, making loop trips or a traverse possible.

More Info: Get info on the trails from Exploring Wells Gray Park by Roland Neave. For camping fees see Wells Gray Provincial Park.

Spring Backpacking Trips in Washington

Since it is a short trip across the border, it’s worth mentioning a few spring backpacking locations in Washington State.

Olympic Coast: The wilderness coast in Olympic National Park is accessible year-round. With several access points, lots of different trips are possible. As a bonus, it’s easier to get permits in the spring. For trip ideas, see my guides to Shi Shi Beach, Ozette Loop, and Toleak Point.

Enchanted Valley: Follow the East Fork Quinault River Trail into the Enchanted Valley in the rainforest of Olympic National Park.

East Bank Trail, Ross Lake: This trail in North Cascades National Park follows the shoreline of Ross Lake. See my East Bank Trail trip report.

Chelan Lakeshore Trail: This 17-mile-long trail in Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest begins and ends with a ferry on Lake Chelan. The trail finishes at the boat-access-only village of Stehekin in North Cascades National Park.

So that gives you 25 different spring backpacking trips in British Columbia to choose from!  Which one would you choose?  I’ve hiked most of these trails (some of them several times) so feel free to ask me more about them in the comments.

READ NEXT:

Book cover for Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

Get My Book…

Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia

A one-stop resource for backpackers in beautiful British Columbia.

  • 40 backpacking trips within a few hours of Vancouver
  • Info about permits, reservations, and campsite facilities
  • Detailed maps and photos
  • Advice for extending your trip
  • Points of cultural and natural history

Join the Backpacking Trips in BC Facebook group

Taryn Eyton

Bill Kinkaid

Saturday 11th of June 2016

The Skagit Valley from Sumallo Grove is also good in May, though maybe not April. But it's also known for lots of deadfall in spring and the trail is subject to flooding.

Mat

Tuesday 10th of May 2016

Yup, spring in the Stein is tick time. Pulled 9 ticks off me one day, no less than one a day. Dozens on my pack, in my dry bag of food. Unreal.

Taryn Eyton

Wednesday 11th of May 2016

Wow, that sounds like a lot of ticks. I've only ever encountered one or two, but that would be on Easter weekend. Just curious when your experience was? I'm guessing a bit later after it warmed up.

Andy

Thursday 3rd of March 2016

Okanagan Mountain Park is another early-season backpack option - we did it over the Victoria-Day weekend a few years back. Lots of wildflowers in May, especially in the burned areas, although it's a bit of a tick-fest as well, which is a bit of a downer. We did have to extricate one tick... yuck.

It could have been the heat, it could have been the rougher-than-expected trail, or it could have been the fact we had to be on guard about ticks the whole time, but it was a really tiring trip. Good thing there was a winery or fifty to stop at for refreshment afterwards!