About Me

Taryn Eyton, author of Happiest Outdoors
Hi, I’m Taryn!

My home is in Vancouver but my heart is in the mountains.  I share advice, info and inspiration about my happy place: The Great Outdoors.

My Dad took me hiking and mountain biking often when I was a kid, but it wasn’t until my first backpacking trip on the West Coast trail in 2004 that I really fell in love with the backcountry.  Since then, I’ve spent as much time outside as possible hiking, backpacking, camping, snowshoeing, biking, paddling and exploring. You can often find me on the trails of Vancouver’s North Shore on weeknights, and somewhere in the backcountry of Southwestern B.C. on weekends.

I’m passionate about discovering new places, revisiting favourite trails, taking photos, and planning trips.  Oh and gear… I love outdoor gear!  I also like to help others learn about how to enjoy the outdoors responsibilities, which is why I got certified as a Leave No Trace Trainer in 2006. I teach totally free Leave No Trace Awareness Workshops and post LNT tips on Instagram each Tuesday as part of the #LeaveNoTraceTuesday hashtag movement I started.

I’d like to share my love for the outdoors with you and I hope it makes you as happy as it’s made me.  Follow along for stories of my human powered adventures, gear reviews, outdoor advice and more.

Where I’ve Been:

Check out my Backpacking Trips List for the complete list of everywhere I’ve ever slept in a tent (or a hut).

Find My Work Elsewhere Online:

 

Want to get in touch? Email me: happiestoutdoorsblog [at] gmail [dot] com

13 Comments

  • Reply
    Roger D
    December 15, 2014 at 9:14 pm

    Hey, wow your so lucky to have these opportunities! I once had them but moved back East..Oh well…excellent article and the ice skating sounds amazing!

  • Reply
    Victoria
    December 16, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    Hi!
    Love your Instagram page. Just wondering how long elfin lakes took you a couple weeks ago?
    Thanks
    Victoria

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      December 16, 2014 at 10:59 pm

      Hi Victoria. Glad you like the photos! Elfin Lakes took us about 7.5 hours including a longish lunch stop at the lakes. I was with a fairly fast group so I think most people would take a bit longer. As well, once there is enough snow to do it on snowshoes it would definitely take longer as snowshoeing is a bit slower than just walking. I wrote a blog post about our trip to Elfin if you want more info: https://happiestoutdoors.ca/elfin-lakes/

  • Reply
    swellconditions
    January 27, 2015 at 6:21 am

    Hello Taryn, I found you though Instagram – what a beautiful gallery you have there! I just wanted to say “hi” and I’m glad I found your blog, you’ve got some great posts here! ~ Heather

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      January 27, 2015 at 6:14 pm

      Hi Heather, So glad you have enjoyed my blog and it’s always great to make another “Insta”-friend. I’ve added your blog to my RSS reader and I look forward to more posts from you. – Taryn

  • Reply
    Karen Kirsch
    February 12, 2015 at 3:14 pm

    Hi Taryn,

    I also follow you on instagram which inspires me daily!! I have to say I am super impressed by this blog. I love it! I’ll be adding it to my list to read.

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      February 12, 2015 at 8:39 pm

      Hi Karen, Thanks for your kind comments about my blog and Instagram! What’s your Instagram user name? I’ll have to check out your feed.

  • Reply
    Andy
    April 25, 2016 at 4:39 pm

    Hi Taryn! I am looking at doing the Cheakamus Lk to Garibaldi Lk traverse. Advice on direction, route etc….distance between camp sites?
    Thx
    Andy

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      April 25, 2016 at 8:21 pm

      Hi Andy. It’s been a long time since I did that trip (over a decade) and I’ve only ever done it from Rubble Creek trailhead to Cheakmus Lake but I think I can still offer some advice. The Garibaldi Lake area can be very busy (rightly so as it is beautiful) so you should try to plan your trip so that you don’t arrive at the Garibaldi Lake campground on a Friday or Saturday night as the campground will be full. You might also want to plan to spend an extra day at Garibaldi Lake so you can hike Black Tusk or Mount Price. On the actual traverse, the middle day between Garibaldi Lake and the Helm Creek campsite is a nice hike with lots of interesting things to see, especially the cinder flats. If you have enough time, definitely hike up Panorama Ridge as the view is amazing. The Helm Creek campsite is nothing special (and can be VERY buggy). The switch back trail from Helm Creek campsite to Cheakamus Lake is similar to the Rubble Creek switchbacks up to Garibaldi Lake except that the Helm Creek side is way way WAY less busy. Other than timing your arrival to Garibaldi Lake to a day that won’t be as busy, I think you could easily hike the traverse in either direction. Have fun!

  • Reply
    Kayla
    July 3, 2016 at 11:10 am

    Hi Taryn!
    I was wondering where did you get Leave No Trace Trainer certified?
    I love backpacking! 🙂
    Kayla

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      July 3, 2016 at 10:50 pm

      I got certified when I lived in Halifax, Nova Scotia but there are trainers everywhere. If you are in Canada check out leavenotrace.ca and for America lnt.org as there are listings for trainers on both sites. Often people who teach wilderness survival, wilderness first aid, avalanche safety, or work as guides will also run Leave No Trace courses. You can take a short awareness workshop (anything from a few hours to a full day) or you can take a 2-day course to become a certified Trainer (that’s what I did). You can also take a 5-day course to become a Master Educator so you can train new trainers.

  • Reply
    Suzanne
    December 20, 2016 at 1:04 pm

    HI Taryn,
    Love your blog! I came across it as I was planning a walk at UBC. I was wondering if you’d consider doing some additional info for future walks/hikes? You’ve got a great resource going here, but I have to go hike the trails on my own to check the accessibility factor for people with wheelchairs or other physical disabilities. Here’s some ideas: http://www.wheelchairtraveling.com/how-to-rate-wheelchair-accessible-hiking-trails

    Just a thought to help the beauty of the outdoors become more accessible for all 🙂

    • Reply
      Taryn Eyton
      December 21, 2016 at 9:10 pm

      Hi Suzanne. Glad you love the blog! I actually did some work at UBC on universal design and accessibility when I was a student there over 10 years ago. I worked on the first version of UBC’s wayfinding/mapping website to provide universal access information for each and every building for wheelchair users or others with physical disabilities. So I’m familiar with the challenges that some people face when navigating the built environment, and I guess by extension, the natural environment as well.

      Thus far I haven’t included any information on my trail posts about whether the trail is suitable for wheelchairs or those with physical disabilities because unfortunately 99% of the places that I hike are probably too challenging for those users. I agree that the beauty of the outdoors should be accessible for all, and there are definitely places that work well for wheelchair users or those with physical disabilities. A couple of trails spring to mind that are designed for universal access: Yew Lake trail at Cypress Provincial Park and the Spirea Nature Trail at Golden Ears Provincial Park. I’m sure there must be more. A thought for you: If you’ve spent the time exploring trails checking to see if they are accessible for physically disabled users, maybe you could start a blog about that? It sounds like you have some good info to share 🙂

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